Manage your Intellectual Property in Latin America

FAQs

Please visit our FAQs section and if you do not find the answer you are looking for, please do not hesitate to contact with our helpline.

Argentina

Patent application fees in Argentina vary depending on the number of claims: Application fees (less than 10 claims): Legal Person EUR136. Natural Person EUR55 Examination fees (less than 10 claims): Legal Person EUR114. Natural Person EUR45 Additional claim (application + examination): Legal Person EUR13. Natural Person EUR5 Take into account that these amounts do not include other costs (such as drafting, translations, representative´s fees etc.) that you may incur during the registration procedure
A trade mark application in Argentina costs around EUR50. Take into account that these amounts do not include other costs that you may incur during the registration procedure. Please contact our helpline if you need further information tailored to your case.
1. Online: via the INPI webpage. Scanned documents supporting the data stated in the application form must be attached too (if required) before finishing the processing. After that, an electronic payment slip, to be paid via any payment method suggestedoin the website, will appear. Homebanking is also accepted. Within 24 hours following the payment, you can access the website and see the reference number assigned to your application.  2. In person: at INPI’s offices. A search to see if the trademark is available can be performed in the Trademark Reports Desk (Mesa de Informes de Marcas) located on the bottom floor of INPI’s building. Afterwards you should pay the registration application fee in the Cash Office (Tesorería) located on the ground floor and then submit the application form duly filled in by the applicant at the General Reception Desk (Mesa General de Entradas).  The application form can be submitted in person by any person that complies with the abovementioned requirements (Federal capital domicile), including certified IP agents or representatives. The representatives must submit a copy of the Power of Attorney signed by them declaring on oath that he/she is faithful to the original and that it empowers him/her to act as such.  3. By mail: Applications must be sent by Argentinean postal service using a postal order with the name INPI 5100/622 RECAUDADORA FF 12 with the corresponding fees, the corresponding mail certificate and forms. They  should all be sent in the same envelope to: I.N.P.I. - (Sección Mesa de Entradas) Av. Paseo Colón 717 – 1er Piso. CP 1063 – Capital Federal. After submission, we recommend you check the Trademark Bulletin (Boletín de Marcas) within 10 or 15 days to see if INPI has made observations on the registration application so that you have time to rectify it and be able to proceed with the application.   
The application form and required documents must be in Spanish. Duly certified copies (sworn translator) must be submitted for every document issued in any other language.
As part of the Berne Convention, Argentina does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. However, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Regarding trademarks, patents, designs and utility models, Argentinian Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Argentina. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, in accordance with its the international obligations under the Paris Convention and the TRIPS Agreement, Argentina provides a certain degree of protection to unregistered well-known marks. In addition, Argentinian national Law provides the owner of a trademark not registered but used in commerce certain rights, as for instance the right to oppose. On the other hand, be aware that in contrast with Europe, unregistered designs are not protected in Argentina. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.
After the application, the main stages towards the registration of your trademark are: Formal examination (within the first 90 days). INPI performs a formal examination of the application and documents submitted and checks whether the data, PoA, paid fees, etc comply with the regulations. Publication in the Trademark Bulletin. During this stage, INPI publishes the Trademark application in the Official Gazette (Boletín de la Dirección Nacional de Marcas) for free.  Opposition stage. After publication, there are 30 calendar days for third parties to oppose the trademark application that they feel may infringe their rights before the National Directorate of Intellectual Property in Argentina. Substantive examination: If there are no oppositions – or they are finally rejected-, INPI will grant the registration if the trademark meets the requirements. Registration. Finally, the trademark will be registered and the corresponding title will be issued and will last for 10 years from the granting date. Current national legislation in force allows contractual assignment of the trademark/trademark’s application, thus providing another way of acquiring signs in the country. Moreover, licences can be granted for use of the trademark.
Words, with or without conceptual content, Drawings, images, emblems, monograms, Engravings, stamps, seals, A combination of colours applied to specific parts of the product or packaging, Letters, numbers, or a combination of both, Packaging, Original slogans, A combination of all of the above items. In Argentina, as in Europe, packaging may be registered as a three-dimensional mark. Despite the fact that the Argentinian Institute for Intellectual Property (INPI) Regulation does not provide for sound marks they are accepted as are smell marks. 
Patent protection lasts for 20 years, calculated from the filing date of the application. This legal protection cannot be extended and/or renewed.
Protection lasts 10 years from the filing date. 
It takes approximately 18 months to get a trademark registration in Argentina, provided that there are no third party oppositions or objections ex officio submitted by INPI. In the event of opposition or objection, the procedure can extend over several years. It has to be highlighted that in Argentina the INPI Objections may be based not only on absolute grounds for refusal but also on the grounds of similarity to an earlier trademark (relative grounds). This is not the case in Europe, where only the owner of each trademark can oppose against the registration of a sign that may lead to confusion. 
Depending on the IPR concerned the competent authority may vary: The office in charge of Patents, Utility Models, Trademarks, Designs and Appellations of Origin is the Instituto Nacional de Propiedad Intelectual (INPI). With regards Copyright, and depending on the nature of the work, the competent offices are: Copyrighted works, in general: (DNDA) Books: Argentina Book Chamber (CAL) Software: Chamber of Software and IT Service Companies (CESSI) Musical works: Argentine Society of Music Authors and Composers (SADAIC) Finally, the competent authority for Plant Varieties is the Instituto Nacional de Semillas (INASE)
The "Instituto  Nacional de Propiedad Industrial" (INPI) provides free access to its trade mark database where you can find out if the trade mark you are planning to register is already registered.
Contrary to Europe, Argentinean trade mark system is a single-class application system. Therefore, a separate trade mark application must be filed for each class of products or services of the International Classification of Nice (10th edition) for which the trademark protection is requested. To check whether the products or services are within the same class, please refer to INPI's website (in Spanish) or contact our Helpline service. You can also use the WIPO´s Classification web-tool (in English, French and Spanish) http://www.wipo.int/classifications/nivilo/nice/index.htm
According to the Argentinean trademark Law, it is not compulsory to appoint neither an IP Agent nor a legal representative. Nevertheless, the requirement to have a domicile based on the Federal Capital (which is also required for Argentinean applicants) entails appointing a local legal representative if the company intending to register a trademark in Argentina does not have a domicile there.
Trademark protection lasts 10 years from the granting date and can indefinitely renewed each ten years.
As part of the Berne Convention, Argentina does not require any formal registration obligation, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable, under certain circumstances, to register the work, specially to enforce it.
Every stage of the trademark registration proceeding is published by the National Trademark and Patents Office (INPI) in the Official Gazette (Boletín de la Dirección Nacional de Marcas). The most relevant notices are also sent via email (i.e. granting of the trademark). Moreover, applicants may follow the registration proceedings in three different ways: In person: at the INPI' offices located in Paseo Colón 717, 1° Piso, Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires. By telephone:  (011) 4344-4832 Electronically: At the INPI's website.    

Bolivia

As part of the Berne Convention, Bolivia does not require any formal registration, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable to register the work under certain circumstances, specially to enforce it.
Bolivia is a single-class trade mark registration system. Therefore, a separate trade mark application must be filed for each class of goods or services of the International Classification of Nice (10th edition) for which the trade mark protection is requested. To check whether products or services are within the same class, please refer to SENAPI website (in Spanish) or contact our Helpline service. You can also use the WIPO´s Classification web-tool (in English, French and Spanish) http://www.wipo.int/classifications/nivilo/nice/index.htm.
The office in charge of Registration of Intellectual Property is SENAPI, whose website can be found at http://www.senapi.gob.bo/index.asp
20 years counted from the filling date
As part of the Berne Convention, Bolivia does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. However, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Regarding trademarks, patents, designs and utility models, Bolivian Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Bolivia. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, in accordance with its the international obligations under the Paris Convention, the TRIPS Agreement and the Andean Community Decision 486/2000, Bolivia provides a certain degree of protection to unregistered well-known marks. On the other hand, be aware that in contrast with Europe, unregistered designs are not protected in Bolivia. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.
Bolivia has not signed the Patent Cooperation Treaty. Therefore, if you want to file a patent application you must apply for a national patent.
Application plus Publication Fees amount to EUR191. Take into account that these amounts do not include other costs that you may incur during the registration procedure
Spanish is the official language of the Country
Bolivia does not belong to the International Trademark Registration System (Madrid System). Thus, if you want to protect your trademark in the country, you must apply for a national trademark
Application + Publication + Examination Fees amount to EUR255. Take into account that these amounts do not include other costs (such as drafting, translations, representative´s fees etc.) that you may incur during the registration procedure.
Appointing a representative is not mandatory; nevertheless, a valid domicile in Bolivia is required for notification purposes.
Bolivia does not belong to the International Design Registration System (Hague System). Thus, if you want to protect your industrial design in the country, you must apply for a national one
Unfortunately Bolivia does not offer a freely accessible online database; you can request a Prior Trade mark Search to SENAPI (cost around EUR20).

Brazil

It generally takes between 24 to 36 months to register a trademark (from filing the application to the final decision), provided there is no opposition. In the event of opposition, the process may take several years. 
Application fee: General: EUR84 - EUR130. Natural person, Micro and Small Companies: EUR35 - EUR50 Registration fee: General EUR180. Natural person, Micro and Small Companies: EUR72 Take into account that these amounts do not include other costs that you may incur during the registration procedure.
Patent of Inventions protection lasts 20 years from the filing date.
The competent organization is the National Intellectual Property Institute (Instituto Nacional de Propiedad Industrial (INPI)), whose address is Rua São Bento, 01 – Centro, Rio de Janeiro – RJ, 20090-010, Brazil. There are three alternatives: 1. Online Steps to follow for online trademark registration: Register in the E-INPI system in the applicant's own name (client) or on behalf of another party (Advogado/Procurador sem habilitação especial). See the guide to fees and issue the corresponding tax payment form or GRU (Federal Tax Liability Payment Form or Guia de Recolhimento da União) Pay the tax Access the E-Marcas platform and submit the trademark registration application form, attaching the necessary files You can track the process using the Push-INPI System, whereby the applicant can receive the main information about the process by e-mail. 2. In person Using the form in paper format, which is available to print on the INPI website. This must be personally delivered to the headquarters of the organisation in Rio de Janeiro or to any of INPI’s branches in other Brazilian states. 3. By post The paper format can also be submitted by ordinary post. 
Immoral inventions and those which its commercial exploitation is forbidden for public order, ethics, health and environment protection reasons.  
The application form and required documents must be in Portuguese. Duly certified copies (sworn translator) must be submitted for every document issued in any other language.
Utility Models protection lasts 15 years from the filing date.
Formal analysis. When INPI receives the documentation, it checks for formal errors (incorrect data, non-payment of the tax, missing documents, etc.) If any anomalies are detected, an announcement is published in the Official Intellectual Property Gazette (Revista da Propriedade Industrial (RPI)), so that these can be corrected within five days of publication. Publication in the Official Intellectual Property Gazette: After it has been checked and there are no formal mistakes (or they have been corrected) an announcement is published in the RPI so that third parties can oppose the application. Opposition phase: After publication, there is a 60-days period during which third parties whose rights are affected may file oppositions with INPI. If an opposition is filed, the applicant will be notified and will be given 60 days to reply. In-depth examination: If there is no opposition or if the application is successful, INPI will analyze whether it complies with the registration requirements which includes analyzing the grounds for refusal. Registration: If INPI decides to grant the application, the fee for the first ten years' registration and the registration certificate must be paid. The applicant has sixty (60) days from the date on which the granting of the trademark is published to pay the fee. After such period has expired it is still possible to pay the fee during the subsequent 30 days (but with a supplement). Finally, the trademark is registered and the corresponding legal title is issued. 
As part of the Berne Convention, Brazil does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Nevertheless, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Regarding trademarks, patents, designs and utility models, Brazilian Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Brazil. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, this trademark system offers protection to unregistered famous and well-known trademarks (this latter protection in accordance with its international obligations under the Paris Convention and the TRIPS Agreement) and, in addition, it provides a “preferential right” for obtaining registration to the person who has been using a trademark to distinguish an identical, similar or alike product or service, in good faith for at least 6 months before the application inside the national territory. On the other hand, be aware that in contrast with Europe, unregistered designs are not protected in Brazil. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.
Application fee: General: EUR43-EUR63. Natural person, Micro and Small companies: EUR17-EUR25 Examination fee: Geneal: Less than 10 claims: EUR142. Each claim between the 11st and 15th: EUR25. Each claim between 16th and 30th: EUR50. Each claim exceeding the 31th: EUR125. Natural person, Micro and Small companies: Less than 10 claims: EUR57. Each claim between the 11st and 15th: EUR10. Each claim between 16th and 30th: EUR20. Each claim exceeding the 31th: EUR50 Take into account that these amounts do not include other costs (such as drafting, translations, representative's fes, etc.) that you may incur during the registration procedure.
Trademarks composed of letters, words, names, images, symbols, colors, graphic forms or their combinations can be registered. Types of trademark: According to its scope of protection According to its object of protection According to its graphical representation - Product trademarks - Services trademarks - Trademark - Collective Trademark - Certification Trademark - Word mark - Figurative - Combined - Three-dimensional
Yes, but a person residing outside Brazil is required to appoint a duly qualified IP Attorney in Brazil.
No. Unlike in Europe, unregistered designs are not protected in Brazil, therefore you must apply for protection as a Registered Design. Otherwise you would be compelled to defend your design under Unfair Competition Law or Copyright, that is not the optimal defence strategy.
Yes. Software can be protected as a copyrighted work, according the Brazilian Software and Copyright Regulation. As the protection of software is under the general regulation of Copyright, the systems are quite similar and connected, but some key aspects should be noted. The first specificity of software protection is that it is made via the Industrial Property Office (INPI) instead before Biblioteca Nacional.The author can apply his/her source code not to be published, and remain confidential. Another key-aspect is the term of protection: 50 years counting from January 1st of the subsequent year of its publication or creation. Also, the author of a software does not enjoy the right to remove from circulation its work, contrary to the literary works.
Brazilian Law allows that the disclosure of an invention does not affect to the novelty of the Patent or the Design if the owner applies for registration of the IPR within in a given period of time from the disclosure: one year for Patents and 6 months for designs. To enjoy the grace period, the disclosure must be made by the inventor; by the Brazilian National Institute of Intellectual Property (INPI); or by third parties that obtained the information directly or indirectly from the inventor, otherwise the grace period will not be applicable.
Registering a trademark in Brazil usually takes 3-4 years, more in case of oppositions. Currently the INPI is making an extra effort to reduce this period to less than 3 years.
Depending on the IPR concerned the competent authority may vary: The office in charge of Patents, Utility Models, Trademarks, Designs, Software, Semiconductors Layout and Appellations of Origin is the Instituto Nacional da Propriedade Industrial (INPI). With regards Copyright the competent office is the Fundaçao Biblioteca Nacional (FBN), except in the case of software. Finally, the competent authority for Plant Varieties is the Instituto Nacional de Semillas (SNPC)
The "Instituto Nacional da Propriedade Industriale" (INPI) provides free access to its trademark database where you can find if the trademark you are planning to register is already registered.
Brazil adopted the single class trademark registration system. Therefore, a separate trademark application must be filed with respect to each class of products or services of the International Classification of Nice (10th edition) for which the trademark protection is requested. To check whether the products or services are within the same class, please refer to INPI's website (in Portuguese) or contact our Helpline service. You can also use the WIPO´s Classification web-tool (in English, French and Spanish) http://www.wipo.int/classifications/nivilo/nice/index.htm
Natural or legal person residing abroad must designate a duly authorised representative in Brazil.
Trademark protection lasts 10 years from the granting date and can indefinitely renewed each ten years.
As part of the Berne Convention, Brazil does not require any formal registration obligation, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable, under certain circumstances, to register the work, specially to enforce it.
Trademark applications are published by the National Trademark and Patent Office (INPI) in the official gazette (Revista da Propriedade Industrial). Check the SEÇÃO II (MARCAS) column to have access to the latest trademark application publications. Pdf and xml format files are ready to download. Applicants may also follow the whole application proceeding electronically thanks to the PUSH-INPI system (registration required), which sends email notifications if the trademark application number has been submitted.  
Registration may be done directly before the Local competent authority (normally, National Internet Network Center) or through domain name registrars, which are companies accredited by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) e.g http://www.registrobrasil.com.br/

Chile

Patent protection lasts for 20 years, calculated from the filing date of the application. 
Protection lasts for 10 years from the filing date of the application.
1. The sign must be subject to graphical representation: This includes sound marks. Smell marks, three-dimensional forms and those which have grounds for refusal are not subject to registration. 2. The sign must fulfill the function of distinguishing the product or service they refer to. The trademark must differentiate a product from another. E.g. INAPI refused the trademark APPLEBEST for fruit. 
Fees are set depending on a monthly variable rate (UTM). The application + publication and examination fees amount to near EUR700. Take into account that these amounts do not include other costs (such as drafting, translations, representative's fees, etc) that you may incur during the registration procedure.
In principle, immoral inventions and those whose commercial exploitation is forbidden for reasons of public order, ethics, health and environment protection.  
The application form and required documents must be in Spanish. Duly certified copies (sworn translator) must be submitted for every document issued in any other language.
As part of the Berne Convention, Chile does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. However, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Regarding trademarks, patents, designs and utility models, Chilean Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Chile. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, in accordance with its the international obligations under the Paris Convention and the TRIPS Agreement, Chile provides a certain degree of protection to unregistered well-known marks. In addition, Chilean Law provides that use of an unregistered mark in Chile will permit its owner to benefit from certain actions and defences against another party who is intended or has registered the same or a similar mark. On the other hand, be aware that in contrast with Europe, unregistered designs are not protected in Chile. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.
Any word, expression, name, pseudonym, letter, number, image, symbol, graph, figure, and any combination of such signs, as well as any advertising slogan linked to a trademark may be registered as a trademark. 
There is no great restriction to apply for a patent or a trademark in Chile, since the application can be submitted by both a natural person and a legal entity. In the event that a non-resident wishes to apply for a patent or a trademark in Chile, a local address must be indicated. In case the person does not have any, he/she must appoint a legal representative or an attorney in Chile. The requirements in MERCOSUR countries are similar to those in Chile, a local domicile in the country or a legal representative is needed.
Depending on the IPR concerned the competent authority may vary: The office in charge of Patents, Utility Models, Trademarks, Designs, Semiconductors Layout and Appellations of Origin is the Intituto Nacional de Propiedad Industrial (INAPI). With regards Copyright the competent office is the Intellectual Property Department of the Dirección de Bibliotecas, Archivos y Museos (DIBAM), including software. Finally, the competent authority for Plant Varieties is Servicio Agrícola Ganadero (SAG)
The "Instituto  Nacional de Propiedad Industrial" (INAPI) provides free access to its trademark database where you can find if the trademark you are planning to register is already registered.
Multiple-class trademark applications and registrations are accepted in Chile. However, a product and a service cannot be requested together, but on separate application forms.
There is no great restriction to apply for a Patent or a trade mark in Chile, since the application can be submitted by either a natural person or a legal entity. Non-resident that wants to apply for a patent or a trade mark in Chile should have a local domicile or, otherwise, appoint a legal representative or an attorney in Chile.
Fees are set depending on monthly variable rate  (UTM). Fees for trade mark, geographical indications or appellation of origin registrations are EUR113 for each class of product or service plus the publication fees (EUR46). Take into account that these amounts do not include other costs that you may incur during the registration procedure.
Trademark protection lasts 10 years from the granting date and can indefinitely renewed each ten years.
As part of the Berne Convention, Chile does not require any formal registration obligation, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable, under certain circumstances, to register the work, specially to enforce it.
Registration may be done directly before the Local competent authority (normally, National Internet Network Center) or through domain name registrars, which are companies accredited by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) e.g https://www.nic.cl/

Colombia

As part of the Berne Convention, Colombia does not require any formal registration, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable to register the work under certain circumstances, specially to enforce it.
Application fees for a Trademark in Colombia amount to 227 euros + 113 euros per additional class. Take into account that this amount does not include other costs that you may incur during the registration procedure. Please contact our helpline if you need information tailored to your case.
Spanish is the official language of the Country
Colombia is member to the Patent Cooperation Treaty. Hence EU SMEs could benefit from the advantages of filing a international PCT application.
20 years counted from the filing date
Colombia is member to the Madrid System. Hence EU SMEs could benefit from the advantages of applying for a International Trademark Registration.
As part of the Berne Convention, Colombia does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. However, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Regarding trademarks, patents, designs and utility models, Colombian Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Colombia. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, in accordance with its the international obligations under the Paris Convention, the TRIPS Agreement and the Andean Community Decision 486/2000, Colombia provides a certain degree of protection to unregistered well-known marks. On the other hand, be aware that in contrast with Europe, unregistered designs are not protected in Colombia. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.
The office in charge of Registration of Intellectual Property is the Superintendencia de Industria y Comercio (SIC) whose website can be visited at http://www.sic.gov.co/drupal/ In case of Copyright the competent Office is Dirección Nacional de Derechos de Autor (DNDA) http://www.derechodeautor.gov.co/
Applicants without domicile in Colombia must appoint a legal representative who could be either a Colombian representative or a foreigner one, subject that they are registered before to Consejo Superior de la Judicatura, the national register for attorneys.
Colombia does not belong to the International Design Registration System (Hague System). Thus, if you want to protect your industrial design in the country, you must apply for a national one
It is possible to conduct a Trademark Search in Colombia by using its own free-access Trademark Database http://serviciospub.sic.gov.co/Sic/ConsultaEnLinea/2013/index.php
The initial fee, that includes up to 10 claims and includes the patentability examination, amounts to EUR340. In case of more than 10 claims, the applicant should pay EUR10 for each extra claim. Take into account that these amounts do not include other costs (such as drafting, translations, representative's fees etc) that you may incur during the registration procedure.

Costa Rica

20 years counted from the filing date
Costa Rica does not belong to the International Trademark Registration System (Madrid System). Thus, if you want to protect your trademark in the country, you must apply for a national trademark
As part of the Berne Convention, Costa Rica does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. However, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Trademarks rights in Costa Rica are acquired through use. This means that first and continuously use of a trademark within the national territory provides you preferential rights over it. Nonetheless, it is advisable to register the trademark as to have proof of ownership -which would be useful in cases of infringement-, and to fully enjoy the exclusive rights established by the National Law. Moreover, even though is possible -under certain conditions- to oppose a registration of a trademark based on an unregistered trademark, it is required to file a trademark application from 15 days of filing the opposition. Regarding patents, designs and utility models, Costa Rica’s Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Costa Rica. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, be aware that in contrast with Europe, unregistered designs are not protected in Costa Rica. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.
It is not mandatory to appoint an attorney. For notification purposes, foreigners (either natural or legal person) must indicate a local domicile or fax. The signature of the applicant must be certified by a lawyer (cost around EUR25). Any Costa Rica natural person can act as a representative.
The office in charge of Registration of Intellectual Property is the Registro Nacional, whose website can be visited at http://www.rnpdigital.com/propiedad_industrial/index.htm  
Costa Rica does not belong to the International Design Registration System (Hague System). Thus, if you want to protect your industrial design in the country, you must apply for a national one
The application fee is EUR162 for individuals, Micro and Small companies and amounts to EUR540 for the rest of applicants. Registration fee (to be paid once the Patent is granted) amount to the same quantities while the mandatory Examination fees range between EUR432 and EUR648. Take into account that these amounts do not include other costs (such as drafting, translations, representative's fees, etc) that you may incur during the registration procedure.
Registro Nacional offer on its web page the possibility for registered users to perform a limited search that does not include the protected products or services. For a complete report you should perform it in person at the computers that Registro Nacional have at your disposal in its headquarters in San José or request a Certificate on Prior Registered Trade marks, including products and services (fee: EUR20 approx.)
Multiple-class trademark applications are accepted in Costa Rica. Nevertheless, the cost of applying for an additional class is the same as applying for an additional trade mark. Hence, in some cases it may be advisable to register more than one trade mark for different classes of goods and services (e.g. if one of the classes is very likely to be opposed by a third party).
As part of the Berne Convention, Costa Rica does not require any formal registration, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable to register the work under certain circumstances, specially to enforce it.
Application fees for a Trade mark in Costa Rica amount to EUR54 + EUR54 per additional class. Take into account that these amounts do not include other costs (such as drafting, translations, representative's fees, etc.) that you may incur during the registration procedure.  
Spanish is the official language of the Country
Costa Rica is member to the Patent Cooperation Treaty. Hence EU SMEs could benefit from the advantages of filing a international PCT application.

Cuba

Application plus Examination fees amount to EUR653. Take into account that this amount does not include other costs (such as drafting, translations, representative's fees, etc.) that you may incur during the registration procedure nor the annual payment that you have to perform.
Cuba is member to the Patent Cooperation Treaty. Hence EU SMEs could benefit from the advantages of filing a international PCT application.
Foreigners that don’t have a residence or commercial establishment in Cuba need to appoint a representative that needs to be an Industrial Property Official Agent.
As part of the Berne Convention, Cuba does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. However, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Regarding trademarks, patents, designs and utility models, Cuban Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Cuba. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, in accordance with its the international obligations under the Paris Convention and the TRIPS Agreement, Cuba provides a certain degree of protection to unregistered well-known marks. On the other hand, be aware that in contrast with Europe, unregistered designs are not protected in Cuba. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.
Cuba is member to the Madrid System. Hence EU SMEs could benefit from the advantages of applying for a International Trademark Registration.
OCPI allows to file a multiclass application for a single Trademark.
Application fees for a Trademark in Cuba amount to 358 euros for up to three classes and 269 euros for any additional class. Take into account that this amount does not include other costs that you may incur during the registration procedure. Please contact our helpline if you need information tailored to your case. 
Spanish is the official language of the Country
Cuba does not belong to the International Design Registration System (Hague System). Thus, if you want to protect your industrial design in the country, you must apply for a national one
You can assess availability through OCPI http://www.ocpi.cu/marcas/104   
The office in charge of Registration of Intellectual Property is OCPI, whose website can be found at http://www.ocpi.cu/ while the office in charge of Copyright is CENDA http://www.cenda.cult.cu/
As part of the Berne Convention, Cuba does not require any formal registration, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable to register the work under certain circumstances, specially to enforce it.
20 years counted from the filling date

Dominican Republic

It is not mandatory to appoint a representative, however, if you do not have a legal domicile in Dominican Republic, a local representative should be appointed for notification purposes.
Dominican Republic is member to the Patent Cooperation Treaty. Hence EU SMEs could benefit from the advantages of filing a international PCT application.
Dominican Republic does not belong to the International Trademark Registration System (Madrid System). Thus, if you want to protect your trademark in the country, you must apply for a national trademark
Application fees for a Trademark in the Dominican Republic amount to 97 euros per class. Take into account that this amount does not include other costs that you may incur during the registration procedure. Please contact our helpline if you need information tailored to your case. 
As part of the Berne Convention, Dominican Republic does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. However, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Regarding trademarks, patents, designs and utility models, Dominican Republic’s Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Dominican Republic. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, this trademark system offers the following protection to unregistered trademarks: In accordance with its international obligations under the Paris Convention and the TRIPS Agreement, Dominican Republic protects unregistered well-known marks. Grants, under certain conditions, a “preferential right” for obtaining registration to the person who has been using a trademark in good faith and in trade since the earliest date inside the national territory. Do not allow the registration of a trademark which is identical or similar to an unregistered trademark that is used by a third party who would have better right to obtain the registry, so long as the trademark is for the same products or services, or for products or services that are different but might be associated or connected. On the other hand, be aware that in contrast with Europe, unregistered designs are not protected in Dominican Republic. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.
Dominican Republic does not belong to the International Design Registration System (Hague System). Thus, if you want to protect your industrial design in the country, you must apply for a national one
ONAPI allows to file a multiclass application for a single Trademark. For the classification of the goods and services, ONAPI uses the International Classification of Goods and Services established by the Nice Agreement.
The office in charge of Registration of Intellectual Property is ONAPI, whose website can be found at http://onapi.gob.do// while the office in charge of Copyright is ONDA http://www.cultura.gob.do/
Through an application form before ONAPI previous payment of the appropriate fee. All the information is available at ONAPI.
Application plus Examination fees amount to EUR594. Take into account that this amount does not include other costs (such as drafting, translations, representative's fees, etc.) that you may incur during the registration procedure.
Spanish is the official language of the Country
As part of the Berne Convention, Dominican Republic does not require any formal registration, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable to register the work under certain circumstances, specially to enforce it.

Ecuador

Ecuadorian trade mark system is a single-class application system. Therefore, a separate trade mark application must be filed with respect to each class of products or services of the International Classification of Nice for which the trade mark protection is requested. To check whether the products or services are included within the same class, please refer to WIPOs Nice Classification website http://www.wipo.int/classifications/nivilo/nice/index.htm or contact our Helpline. 
Spanish is the official language of the Country
As part of the Berne Convention, Ecuador does not require any formal registration, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable to register the work under certain circumstances, specially to enforce it.
Application fees for a Trade mark in Ecuador amount to EUR191. Once granted, the applicant must pay a grant and registration fee (EUR367). Take into account that these amounts do not include other costs that you may incur during the registration procedure. 
The office in charge of Registration of Intellectual Property is IEPI, whose website can be found at http://www.propiedadintelectual.gob.ec/
Ecuador is member to the Patent Cooperation Treaty. Hence EU SMEs could benefit from the advantages of filing a international PCT application.
20 years counted from the filling date
As part of the Berne Convention, Ecuador does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. However, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Regarding trademarks, patents, designs and utility models, Ecuadorian Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Ecuador. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, in accordance with its the international obligations under the Paris Convention, the TRIPS Agreement and the Andean Community Decision 486/2000, Ecuador provides a certain degree of protection to unregistered well-known marks. On the other hand, be aware that in contrast with Europe, unregistered designs are not protected in Ecuador. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.
The application fee is EUR2582 while the mandatory examination fee amounts to EUR1386. Take into account that these amounts do not include other costs (such as drafting, translations, representative´s fees etc) that you may incur during the registration procedure. Please contact our helpline if you need further information tailored to your case.
Foreign-based companies need to appoint a legal representative to perform any acts and legal transactions (including IPR applications).
Ecuador does not belong to the International Trademark Registration System (Madrid System). Thus, if you want to protect your trademark in the country, you must apply for a national trademark
Unfortunately, there is no public trade mark database in Ecuador; you should request it to IEPI at an approximated cost of EUR15
Ecuador does not belong to the International Design Registration System (Hague System). Thus, if you want to protect your industrial design in the country, you must apply for a national one

El Salvador

Previous requirement to “Centro Nacional de Registros” and paying 18 euros.
Application fees for a Trademark in El Salvador amount to 89 euros per class. Take into account that this amount does not include other costs that you may incur during the registration procedure. Please contact our helpline if you need information tailored to your case. 
20 years counted from the filling date
As part of the Berne Convention, El Salvador does not require any formal registration, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable to register the work under certain circumstances, specially to enforce it.
El Salvador is member to the Patent Cooperation Treaty. Hence EU SMEs could benefit from the advantages of filing a international PCT application.
The office in charge of Registration of Intellectual Property is CNR, whose website can be found at http://www.cnr.gob.sv/
Applicants without domicile in El Salvador must appoint a legal representative who has to be an attorney. This representation needs to be accredited before the Registry. 
As part of the Berne Convention, Salvador does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. However, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Regarding trademarks, patents, designs and utility models, Salvadoran Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Salvador. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, this trademark system offers protection to unregistered famous and well-known trademarks (this latter protection in accordance with its international obligations under the Paris Convention and the TRIPS Agreement). On the other hand, be aware that in contrast with Europe, unregistered designs are not protected in Salvador. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.
El Salvador does not belong to the International Trademark Registration System (Madrid System). Thus, if you want to protect your trademark in the country, you must apply for a national trademark
El Salvador’s trademark system is a single-class application system. Therefore, a separate trademark application must be filed with respect to each class of products or services.
Spanish is the official language of the Country
El Salvador does not belong to the International Design Registration System (Hague System). Thus, if you want to protect your industrial design in the country, you must apply for a national one
Application plus Examination fees amount to EUR51. Take into account that this amount does not include other costs (such as drafting, translations, representative's fees, etc.) that you may incur during the registration procedure.

Guatemala

20 years counte from the filling date
Guatemala does not belong to the International Trademark Registration System (Madrid System). Thus, if you want to protect your trademark in the country, you must apply for a national trademark
Applicants without domicile in Guatemala must appoint a legal representative who has to be an active collegiate attorney. This representation needs to be accredited before the Registry. 
The office in charge of Registration of Intellectual Property is RPI, whose website can be found at https://www.rpi.gob.gt/
Spanish is the official language of the Country
Guatemala does not belong to the International Design Registration System (Hague System). Thus, if you want to protect your industrial design in the country, you must apply for a national one
Application fees for a Trademark in Guatemala amount to 36 euros per class. Take into account that this amount does not include other costs that you may incur during the registration procedure. Please contact our helpline if you need information tailored to your case. 
As part of the Berne Convention, Guatemala does not require any formal registration, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable to register the work under certain circumstances, specially to enforce it.
Unfortunately, there is no public Trademark Database in Nicaragua. You have to request it to RPI and the costs range from 13 euros to 113 according to what you are searching for.
Guatemala is member to the Patent Cooperation Treaty. Hence EU SMEs could benefit from the advantages of filing a international PCT application.
Application plus Examination fees amount to EUR718. Take into account that these amount do not include other costs (such as drafting, translations, representative's fees, etc.) that you may incur during the registration procedure.
As part of the Berne Convention, Guatemala does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. However, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Regarding trademarks, patents, designs and utility models, Guatemala’s Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Guatemala. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, in accordance with its the international obligations under the Paris Convention and the TRIPS Agreement, Guatemala provides a certain degree of protection to unregistered well-known marks. Furthermore, in common with Europe, unregistered designs are protected in Guatemala for a period of three years. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.

Honduras

Honduras does not belong to the International Design Registration System (Hague System). Thus, if you want to protect your industrial design in the country, you must apply for a national one
Through an application form available at https://digepih.webs.com/marcasformularios.htm
20 years counted from the filling date
As part of the Berne Convention, Honduras does not require any formal registration, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable to register the work under certain circumstances, specially to enforce it.
As part of the Berne Convention, Honduras does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. However, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Regarding trademarks, patents, designs and utility models, Honduran Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Honduras. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, in accordance with its the international obligations under the Paris Convention and the TRIPS Agreement, Honduras provides a certain degree of protection to unregistered well-known marks. In addition, Honduras Trademark Law also grants, under certain conditions, a “preferential right” for obtaining registration to the person who has been using a trademark in good faith and in trade since the earliest date. On the other hand, be aware that in contrast with Europe, unregistered designs are not protected in Honduras. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.
Application plus Examination fees amount to EUR500. Take into account that this amount does not include other costs (such as drafting, translations, representative's fees, etc.) that you may incur during the registration procedure.
Honduras is member to the Patent Cooperation Treaty. Hence EU SMEs could benefit from the advantages of filing a international PCT application.
Spanish is the official language of the Country
There is no need to hire an attorney for representation; however, it is mandatory to be represented by a person who is domiciled in Honduras.
The office in charge of Registration of Intellectual Property is DIGERPIH, whose website can be found at http://www.digepih.webs.com/
Application fees for a Trademark in Honduras amount to 28 euros per class. Take into account that this amount does not include other costs that you may incur during the registration procedure. Please contact our helpline if you need information tailored to your case. 
Honduras does not belong to the International Trademark Registration System (Madrid System). Thus, if you want to protect your trademark in the country, you must apply for a national trademark
Honduran trademark system is a single-class application system. Therefore, a separate trademark application must be filed with respect to each class of products or services of the International Classification of Nice for which the trademark protection is requested. To check whether the products or services are included within the same class, please refer to WIPOs Nice Classification website http://www.wipo.int/classifications/nivilo/nice/index.htm. 

Mexico

Application plus Registration fees for a Trade mark in Mexico amount to EUR126 (VAT Excluded). Take into account that these amounts do not include other costs that you may incur during the registration procedure. 
Spanish is the official language of the Country
Mexico is member to the Patent Cooperation Treaty. Hence EU SMEs could benefit from the advantages of filing a international PCT application.
20 years counted from the filing date
Mexico is member of the Madrid System. Hence EU SMEs could benefit from the advantages of applying for a International Trademark Registration.
As part of the Berne Convention, Mexico does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. However, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Regarding trademarks, patents, designs and utility models, Mexico’s Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Mexico. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, in accordance with its the international obligations under the Paris Convention and the TRIPS Agreement, Mexico provides a certain degree of protection to unregistered well-known marks. In addition, Mexican Law provides that use of an unregistered mark in Mexico will permit its owner to benefit from certain actions and defences against another party who has registered the same or a similar mark. On the other hand, be aware that in contrast with Europe, unregistered designs are not protected in Mexico. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.
The office in charge of Registration of Intellectual Property is the Instituto Mexicano de Propiedad Industrial (IMPI) whose website can be visited at http://www.impi.gob.mx/. In case of Copyright the competent Office is INDAUTOR http://www.indautor.gob.mx/
Mexico does not belong to the International Design Registration System (Hague System). Thus, if you want to protect your industrial design in the country, you must apply for a national one
IMPI Mexico provides free access to its Online Trade mark Database (MARCANET). Additionally you can browse the EUIPO´s Trade mark Database (TM View) where you can conduct your search in English, Spanish, German, French and Italian (Choose advanced search and filter by country).
Natural persons can apply for an IPR without the need of an IP attorney, while legal persons are able to apply for IPRs through any regular representative with enough power.
Mexican trademark system is a single-class application system. Therefore, a separate trademark application must be filed with respect to each class of products or services of the International Classification of Nice for which the trademark protection is requested. To check whether the products or services are included within the same class, please refer to WIPOs Nice Classification website http://www.wipo.int/classifications/nivilo/nice/index.htm.
As part of the Berne Convention, Mexico does not require any formal registration, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable to register the work under certain circumstances, specially to enforce it.
Application plus Registration fees for a Patent in Mexico amount to EUR546 (VAT Excluded). Take into account that these amounts do not include other costs (such as drafting, translations, representative´s fees, etc.) that you may incur during the registration procedure. 

Nicaragua

Nicaragua is member to the Patent Cooperation Treaty. Hence EU SMEs could benefit from the advantages of filing a international PCT application.
As part of the Berne Convention, Nicaragua does not require any formal registration, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable to register the work under certain circumstances, specially to enforce it.
Unfortunately, there is no public Trademark Database in Nicaragua. You have to request it to MIFIC at an approximated cost of EUR16
Nicaragua does not belong to the International Trademark Registration System (Madrid System). Thus, if you want to protect your trademark in the country, you must apply for a national trademark
Application plus Examination fees amount to EUR269. An additional EUR180 has to be paid to register the Patent. Take into account that these amount do not include other costs (such as drafting, translations, representative's fees, etc.) that you may incur during the registration procedure.
20 years counted from the filling date
The office in charge of Registration of Intellectual Property is RPI, whose website can be found at http://www.mific.gob.ni/REGISTRODELAPROPIEDADINTELECTUAL/tabid/110/language/es-NI/Default.aspx
Nicaragua does not belong to the International Design Registration System (Hague System). Thus, if you want to protect your industrial design in the country, you must apply for a national one
Applicants without domicile in Nicaragua must appoint a legal representative who has to be an attorney. This representation needs to be accredited before the Registry. 
Application fees for a Trademark in Nicaragua amount to 90 euros per class. Take into account that this amount does not include other costs that you may incur during the registration procedure. Please contact our helpline if you need information tailored to your case. 
As part of the Berne Convention, Nicaragua does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. However, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Regarding trademarks, patents, designs and utility models, Nicaraguan Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Nicaragua. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, in accordance with its the international obligations under the Paris Convention and the TRIPS Agreement, Nicaragua provides a certain degree of protection to unregistered well-known marks. In addition, Nicaraguan Law does not permit the registration of a sign that is the same or similar to another that has been used in good faith within the national territory for the same kind of products or services. Furthermore, in common with Europe, unregistered designs are protected in Nicaragua for a period of three years. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.
Spanish is the official language of the Country

Panama

Application fees for a Trademark in Panama amount to 66 euros per class. Take into account that this amount does not include other costs that you may incur during the registration procedure. Please contact our helpline if you need information tailored to your case. 
Panama does not belong to the International Design Registration System (Hague System). Thus, if you want to protect your industrial design in the country, you must apply for a national one.
The Panama trademark system is a single-class application system. Therefore, a separate trademark application must be filed with respect to each class of products or services.
As part of the Berne Convention, Panama does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. However, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Trademarks rights in Panama are acquired through use. This means that first and continuously use of a trademark within the national territory provides you preferential rights when registering it. Nonetheless, it is advisable to register the trademark as to have proof of ownership -which would be useful in cases of infringement-, and to fully enjoy the exclusive rights established by the National Law. Moreover, it is possible -under certain conditions- to oppose a registration of a trademark based on an unregistered trademark. Regarding patents, designs and utility models, Panama’s Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Panama. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, in accordance with its the international obligations under the Paris Convention and the TRIPS Agreement, Panama provides a certain degree of protection to unregistered well-known marks. Furthermore, in common with Europe, unregistered designs are protected in Panama for a period of two years. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.
Spanish is the official language of the Country
It requires previous request and payment to DIGERPI.
As part of the Berne Convention, Panama does not require any formal registration, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable to register the work under certain circumstances, specially to enforce it.
Application plus Examination fees amount to EUR959. Take into account that these amount do not include other costs (such as drafting, translations, representative's fees, etc.) that you may incur during the registration procedure.
20 years counted from the filling date
Panama is member to the Patent Cooperation Treaty. Hence EU SMEs could benefit from the advantages of filing a international PCT application.
Applicants without domicile in Panama must appoint a legal representative who has to be an attorney or firm of Attorneys from Panama. This representation needs to be accredited before the Registry. 
The office in charge of Registration of Intellectual Property is DIGERPI, whose website can be found at https://www.digerpi.gob.pa/
Panama does not belong to the International Trademark Registration System (Madrid System). Thus, if you want to protect your trademark in the country, you must apply for a national trademark

Paraguay

As part of the Berne Convention, Paraguay does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. However, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Regarding trademarks, patents, designs and utility models, Paraguayan Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Paraguay. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, in accordance with its the international obligations under the Paris Convention and the TRIPS Agreement, Paraguay provides a certain degree of protection to unregistered well-known marks. On the other hand, be aware that in contrast with Europe, unregistered designs are not protected in Paraguay. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.
The application form and required documents must be in Spanish. Duly certified copies (sworn translator) must be submitted for every document issued in any other language.
Copyright protection lasts for the author’s life plus 70 years after his/her death.  
The cost of the application is approximately 90 euros. Additionally, there is a sum of 3,592 euros for annuities and background reports to be paid by instalments from the 3rd to the 20th year.
Patent protection lasts for 20 years, calculated from the filing date of the application. 
Utility Model protection lasts for 10 years from the filing date.
Software is protected by copyright, which lasts all the author’s life plus 70 years after his/her death. If the right holder is a legal entity, the term of protection shall last for 70 years after the first publication. 
a) Immoral inventions and those which its commercial exploitation is forbidden for public order, ethics, health and environment protection reasons. b) Animal, plants (except microorganisms) and essentially biological processes to produce plants or animals (except microbiological or biological processes).  
Any national or foreign natural or legal person can apply for a patent, whether this person is the inventor or not. An Intellectual Property Agent must necessarily be appointed for the purposes of representation at the Paraguayan Patent Office (DINAPI).
Depending on the IPR concerned the competent authority may vary: The office in charge of Patents, Utility Models, Trademarks, Designs, Appellations of Origin and Geographical Indications is the Dirección Nacional de Propiedad Intelectual, Ministerio de Industria y Comercio (DNAPI). With regards Copyright the competent office is the Dirección Nacional de Derecho de Autor (DNDA), including software. Finally, the competent authority for Plant Varieties is the Dirección de Semillas of the Servicio Nacional de Calidad y Sanidad Vegetal y de Semillas (SENAVE). 
Contrary to Europe, in Paraguay the single class trademark registration system was adopted. Consequenly, a separate trademark application must be filed with respect to each class of products or services of the International Classification of Nice (10th edition) for which the trademark protection is requested.
Trademark protection lasts 10 years from the granting date and can indefinitely renewed each ten years.
As part of the Berne Convention, Paraguay does not require any formal registration obligation, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable, under certain circumstances, to register the work, specially to enforce it.
Registration may be done directly before the Local competent authority (normally, National Internet Network Center) or through domain name registrars, which are companies accredited by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) e.g http://www.nic.py/

Peru

As part of the Berne Convention, Peru does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. However, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Regarding trademarks, patents, designs and utility models, Peruvian Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Peru. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, in accordance with its the international obligations under the Paris Convention, the TRIPS Agreement and the Andean Community Decision 486/2000, Peru provides a certain degree of protection to unregistered well-known marks. On the other hand, be aware that in contrast with Europe, unregistered designs are not protected in Peru. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.
INDECOPI request a prior registration and a 280 euros payment to access to its Trademark Database
There is no need to hire an Intellectual Property Agent for representation; however, having a domicile within the Peruvian territory is mandatory.
Peru does not belong to the International Design Registration System (Hague System). Thus, if you want to protect your industrial design in the country, you must apply for a national one
There is no public trade mark database; INDECOPI requests a EUR264 euros payment to access to its Trade mark Database. An individual (phonetic) search cost ranges between EUR8 (1 class) and EUR29 (45 classes).
Application plus Examination fees amount to EUR335. Take into account that these amounts do not include other costs (such as drafting, translations, representative´s fees, etc.) that you may incur during the registration procedure. 
Spanish is the official language of the Country
As part of the Berne Convention, Peru does not require any formal registration, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable to register the work under certain circumstances, specially to enforce it.
Application fees for a Trademark in Peru amount to 148 euros + 148 euros per additional class. Take into account that this amount does not include other costs that you may incur during the registration procedure. Please contact our helpline if you need information tailored to your case.
20 years counted from the filing date
Peru is member to the Patent Cooperation Treaty. Hence EU SMEs could benefit from the advantages of filing a international PCT application.
The office in charge of Registration of Intellectual Property is INDECOPI, whose website can be visited at http://www.indecopi.gob.pe/
Peru does not belong to the International Trademark Registration System (Madrid System). Thus, if you want to protect your trademark in the country, you must apply for a national trademark

Uruguay

Application fees for a Trade mark in Uruguay:   Word Trade mark Rest of Trade marks 1 class EUR103 EUR145 Per additional class EUR63 EUR83           Take into account that these amounts do not include other costs that you may incur during the registration procedure.
According to Uruguayan Trademark Law, it is not compulsory to appoint either an IP Agent or a legal representative to file a trademark application. Nevertheless,if the applicant is not domiciled or have a legal representative in the country, it is compulsory to designate a legal representative if the application is performed online or in person. 
The application form and required documents must be in Spanish. Duly certified copies (sworn translator) must be submitted for every document issued in any other language.
According to Uruguayan trademark Law, in Uruguay the following can be registered as a trademark: One or several words, sentences, letters and numbers or a combination of these items. Drawings, emblems, patterns, reliefs, etc. Combinations of the items of the two previous points. The shape given to the products or packaging (three-dimensional) Sound marks (represented in an appropriate format + a brief description + a sample on a storage medium)
It can be submitted in person to the following address: Ofi- cina de la Dirección Nacional de la Propiedad Industrial, Rincón 719, Montevideo. If you want to submit your application online (which is fas- ter), you need to request a username at the DNPI’s offices (in person). 
Patent protection lasts for 20 years, calculated from the filing date of the application. 
Utility Models protection lasts 10 years from the filing date.
As part of the Berne Convention, Uruguay does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. However, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Regarding trademarks, patents, designs and utility models, Uruguayan Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Uruguay. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, in accordance with its the international obligations under the Paris Convention and the TRIPS Agreement, Uruguay provides a certain degree of protection to unregistered well-known marks. On the other hand, be aware that in contrast with Europe, unregistered designs are not protected in Uruguay. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.  
It is not compulsory to appoint either an IP Agent or a legal representative to file an application. Nevertheless, if the applicant is not domiciled in the country, it is compulsory to appoint a legal representative in the country.
Collective marks are signs used to distinguish a product or service originating from a group of people, while guarantee marks (or certification marks) enable the owner to certify some characteristics of specific products or services (i.e. their quality, nature or methodology). In Uruguay, it is possible to register both collective marks and guarantee marks. Besides regular trademark registration requirements, a copy of the regulations governing the use of the collective/guarantee mark (conditions of use of the mark including sanctions, persons authorized, mem- bership specifications, etc.) must be attached to the application. Likewise, companies intending to operate under a certifi- cation mark in Uruguay will need a previous authorisation granted by a certified body such as UNIT. 
The exclusive ownership of the trademark is only granted for the products or services indicated in the application. 1. Submission: Upon submission, an application num- ber will be given and the submission date and time will be registered. 2. Error-handling procedures: In the event of formal mistakes, a 30-day period will be granted for co- rrecting the error. Failing to rectify errors means the application will be considered abandoned. If priority was not indicated in the trademark application submitted, a 90-day period will be granted to provide the information required. Failure to do so means the right of priority will be lost. It is prohibited to change the sign itself at this stage of the procedure. Any modification intro- duced will be considered as a new application. The number of products or services for which the application was submitted cannot be in- creased, even if they belong to the same class. However, limitations to the scope of protection could be introduced and therefore classes, pro- ducts or services can be eliminated. 3. Publication: if the application meets all the require- ments, an extract of the trademark application will be published in the Industrial Property Bulletin, after which third parties will have 30 days to submit op- positions. 4. Formal examination: Following publication, a formal examination of the application will take place. In the event of mistakes, these will have to be rectified within ten days. 5. Substantive examination: The DNPI will also perform a substantive examination to check if the submitted sign complies with the applicable law. If it does not, the DNPI is entitled to lodge an opposition ex officio at any time up until the final resolution. In the event of opposition ex officio from the DNPI or from third parties, a 30-natural-day period will be granted to the applicant to reply to oppositions. 6. Final decision: After the formal and substantive exa- mination and if there are no oppositions, the trade- mark registration will be granted and a trademark certificate will be issued. In the event of oppositions, the DNPI will take a final decision either granting to- tally or partially the registration or refusing it.
  Application Publication Examination Up to 10 claims EUR208 EUR37 EUR37 Each additional claim between 10 and 50 EUR4 EUR37 EUR6 Each additional claim exceeding 50 EUR6 EUR37 EUR6             Additionally applicants should pay a registration fee once the Patent is granted that ranges from EUR124 (10 claims or less) to EUR870 (more than 200 claims).         Take into account that these amounts do not include other costs (such as drafting, translations, representative´s fees etc) that you may incur during the registration procedure. 
In Uruguay, it takes 12 months calculated from the registration date to have a trademark registration granted, provided that there are no Oppositions. In the event of Opposition, the procedure can take up to two years approximately.
a) Surgery and diagnostic methods applied to human body or animals.  b) Immoral inventions and those which its commercial exploitation is forbidden for public order, ethics, health and environment protection reasons.  
The office in charge of Registration of Intellectual Property is MIEM, whose website can be found at https://www.miem.gub.uy/tramites?combine=&field_tags_tid%255B%255D=47 whereas DDA department of National Library is in charge of Copyright registration http://www.bibna.gub.uy.
MIEM gives free access to its online trade mark database (IPAS) at the following link https://www.miem.gub.uy/tramites (User: DNPI; Password: DNPI)
The Uruguayan trademark registration system is the multi-class one. Moreover, a sign may be protected for many classes of products and services with a single trademark application.
  Trademark protection lasts 10 years from the granting date and can indefinitely renewed each ten years.
As part of the Berne Convention, Uruguay does not require any formal registration obligation, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable, under certain circumstances, to register the work, specially to enforce it.
Registration may be done directly before the Local competent authority (normally, National Internet Network Center) or through domain name registrars, which are companies accredited by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) e.g https://www.nic.uy/Registrar/

Venezuela

As part of the Berne Convention, Venezuela does not require any formal registration to provide protection to Copyright works; the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. However, registration may very useful in enforcement actions as a proof of ownership, and of the date of creation or the content of the work itself. Regarding trademarks, patents, designs and utility models, Venezuela’s Law adopts the first to file principle, what means that exclusive rights are granted to the party that firstly register the relevant IP right in Venezuela. Therefore, to benefit from full legal protection and turn intangible assets into tradable assets, it would be necessary to register your creations. Nevertheless, be aware that in contrast with Europe, unregistered designs are not protected in Venezuela. If you want to know more about how to protect your creations, and get tailored advice to your specific case, contact our Helpline. It is free, fast and confidential.
The application form and required documents must be in Spanish. Duly certified copies (sworn translator) must be submitted for every document issued in any other language.
The duration of each type of patent is different. The starting point of the duration of the Patent is the date of granting, not the application date: - Invention Patent: 5- 10 years (upon request) - Improvement Patent: 5 years - Industrial model/ design: 5-10 years This duration is not consistent with TRIPS agreement (20 years from the application date in case of patents and 10 years in case of industrial designs/models). Therefore, the time of protection is lower than in the TRIPS member states. This situation is expected to change by 31st July 2016, when the Mercosur harmonized framework is supposed to be fully implemented in Venezuela.
Beverages or food products, medicinal, chemical and pharmaceutical preparations; Financial, speculative, commercial or advertising systems;  The mere use or exploitation of natural products or forces;  New uses or variations over already known objects Work methods or trade secrets Merely theoretical or speculative inventions Inventions contrary to national laws, health and public order, morality, and State security.   
The Application fee for a Patent is around 187 Euros. If this fee is not paid at the time of the application, it will not be processed by SAPI.   Maintenance fees: around 5 €/year.
The SAPI (Servicio Autónomo de Propiedad Intelectual) is competent for the registration of the whole range of Intellectual IP Rights, except Plant Varieties, that should be registered before the Ministry of Agriculture (INIA)
The “Servicio Autónomo de Propiedad Intelectual” (SAPI) do not offer free access to its trademark database. It is possible to apply for a trademark search before SAPI (whose cost is around 31€).
Contrary to Europe, Venezuelan trademark system is a single-class application system. Therefore, a separate trademark application must be filed with respect to each class of products or services of the International Classification of Nice (10th edition) and the Venezuelan Classification for which the trademark protection is requested.
Trademark protection lasts 15 years from the granting date and can indefinitely renewed each ten years.
As part of the Berne Convention, Venezuela does not require any formal registration obligation, the work will be automatically protected from the moment of its creation. Regardless of which it is advisable, under certain circumstances, to register the work, specially to enforce it.
Registration may be done directly before the Local competent authority (normally, National Internet Network Center) or through domain name registrars, which are companies accredited by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) e.g https://registro.nic.ve/

General

Cybersquatting, also known as domain name occupation, is a bad faith practice that consists in registering as domain names third parties’ trademarks. Domain Names authorities set special procedures to fight against cybersquatting and to facilitate the domain name recovery by its lawful owner.
Parties contact each other with a formal request for mediation Selection of mediator Preliminary contacts between the parties and the mediator (exchange of documents) First and further meetings: selection of basic rules of procedure; explanation abaout the conflict; identification of interests; proposed solution Signatue of the agreement and conclusion
The Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) is a international patent filing system that allows the PCT to file patents in each of the 148 Member States. Some of the advantages are that reduces costs and simplify the application proccess, while the end part of the registration proccess should be managed country-by-country.
Mediation is a method where both parties select a mediator by mutual consent, to serve as a neutral third party and help find a solution. In contrast to arbitration, the mediator does not impose a decision that must be abided by the parties, but acts as a guide for reaching an agreement which will be set out in writing and has to be respected by the parties to the dispute. 
Copyright protects any literary, scientific or artistic works: books, music, papers, videos, blog-posts, pictures... are some examples of works that can be protected by Copyrights.
Formal request for arbitration (claim to arbitration) Written submissions of a respondent (acceptance or rejection of arbitration) Arbitration Court appointment Examination of the case (submission of documents, oral hearings, production of evidence, etc.) Arbitration award
Arbitration is an ADR in which the parties freely choose one or many persons (arbitrator) to solve the dispute submitting voluntarily to the decision-maker’s decision (arbitral award), thus discarding court procedures.
Protecting your IP by Copyleft means does not imply to waive any type of protection for your work, if someone uses such work without fulfiling the Copyleft- license requirements (e.g do not quote the author) he shall be liable for Copyright infringement.
They are composed of the meeting venue expenses and the mediator's fee, which is agreed on a mutual basis. It could consist of a daily or hourly remuneration. Alternatively,, the mediation center could charge an additional fee (I.e. World Intellectual Property Office (WIPO) Center for Mediation and Arbitration charges 0,10% of the conflict’s value). Legal representatives' fees and other variable costs are to be added. One of the most remarkable advantages of mediation is that costs are shared equally, while in litigation normally the looser has to cover all costs.
The "Priority Right" is a right granted under Paris Convention which entitles the holder to file new applications in any member state during the priority period, keeping the filing date of the first application as priority date. The priority right lasts twelve months for patents and utilitymodels, and six months for industrial designs and trademarks.
Arbitration costs comprise Arbitration Center fees (administrative fees), arbitrator fees, deposits and cost incurred by any party (lawyers, experts, etc.). They can vary depending on the value of the dispute, number of arbitrators selected, duration and complexity of proceedings and costs incurred (i.e. handling evidence) Expedited proceedings –such as WIPO’s- have lower fees. You can check them in the following link: http://www.wipo.int/amc/es/arbitration/fees/index.html
The Madrid System is an international system that allow applicants to register and manage trademarks in each of of its current 95 Member States.
Alternative Dispute Resolution Mechanisms (ADR) are a set of mechanisms that allows parties to settle contractual (i.e. patent or software licence, trademark coexistence agreements, pharmaceutical products distribution agreements, R&D partnerships) and non-contractual (i.e. patent infringement) disputes between individuals without going to court. ADR consist of Mediation and Arbitration.
The grace period is a period of time before the filing date of a patent/utility model/design application during which public disclosure of an invention (under certain conditions) is allowed without affecting the validity of a subsequent patent/utility model/design application, provided that a complete application is filed within 6 or 12 months of the disclosure.
None of the MERCOSUR countries, nor Chile, is part of the International Trademark System (Madrid System).
None of these countries is part of the International Registration of Industrial Designs (Hague System).
None of these countries is part of the International System of Appellations of Origin.
In Argentina, this process is managed by the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, Fisheries and Food, more specifically, the National Direction of Agroindustries (Dirección Nacional de Agroindustria). In Brazil, both are processed by the National Institute of Intellectual Property Rights (INPI). In Chile, Geographical Indications and Geographical Names are processed by the National Institute of Industrial Property (Instituto Nacional de Propiedad Industrial). In Paraguay, registration must be applied for in the Directorate General of Industrial Property of the Ministry of Industry and Commerce (Dirección General de Propiedad Industrial). In Uruguay, Designations of Origin are registered in the National Directorate of Industrial Property (Dirección Nacional de Propiedad Industrial). Nevertheless, Indications of Origin are protected without registration. In Venezuela, the Autonomous Intellectual Property Service (SAPI) is in charge of Intellectual Property Rights on the subject of designations.
In Argentina, the design is required to be innovative, original, to have a different configuration, and to have innovative, particular features with respect to previous industrial models and designs. Its components cannot be imposed by the purpose of the product, nor be the result of a mere colour change. Finally, it shall not be contrary to morals and good customs. In Brazil, it is required to have a new and original external configuration and to be able to be used as a pattern for industrial manufacturing. Dotted lines and incomplete parts are not registrable as an Industrial Design. In Chile, Industrial Design includes any three-dimensional form and any industrial or handcrafted product that can be used as a pattern to manufacture other units. It must also differ from other similar products by its shape, geometric configuration, ornamentation or a combination of these, as long as these characteristics make it have a special, visible appearance, thus having new features. In Chile, Industrial Design must be new and non-excluded from the legislation. As an internal standard, it is necessary that the product description explains the utility of the design that is being presented. In Paraguay, a design must be new to be registered. It must be able to be used only to accomplish a technical effect, and it cannot be contrary to morals, public order, and good customs. In Uruguay, the product must be new, with an original shape or appearance (it cannot consist of unimportant differences from previous models and designs), it must not have the essential purpose of accomplishing a technical effect or technical exigencies or the purpose the product is to fulfill. The design must have a definite, specific shape and cannot consist of only a colour change of an already existing design. Likewise, no design can be contrary to public policy or good customs. In Venezuela, all new designs or drawing for industrial use can be registered as an industrial design.
In Argentina, this protection has a duration of 5 years from the date of filing and can be extended for another two consecutive periods of the same duration, at the request of the holder. In Brazil, this protection has a duration of 10 years from the date of registration, renewable for 3 additional five-year periods, totalling 25 years. In Chile the duration of the industrial design patent is 10 years from the application date . In Paraguay, the protection after the registration shall last for 5 years from the application date, and can be extended for another two consecutive periods of the same duration. In Uruguay, the period of protection of the industrial design patent lasts 10 years from the application date. In Venezuela, patents of invention, innovation patents or industrial design are issued for 5 or 10 years, depending on the applicant’s wishes. Introduction patents are issued for a period of only 5 years.
No country in the MERCOSUR has non-registered industrial design, unlike the European Union.
In Argentina, intellectual property of works belongs to the creators for their entire life and to their beneficiaries or assigns for 70 years calculated from January 1st of the year after the creator’s decease. In Brazil, creator’s economic rights shall be protected for 70 years calculated from January 1st of the year after the creator’s decease, subject to the order of succession under civil law. In Chile, copyright protection is guaranteed for the entire creator’s life and lasts 70 more years after his/her decease. In Paraguay, economic rights last for the entire creator’s life and 70 years after his/her decease. In Uruguay, the creator is holder of the copyright for his whole life and his beneficiaries or assigns are holders of the copyright for 50 years after the creator’s decease. In Venezuela, copyright lasts for the whole creator’s life and expires after 60 years calculated from January 1st of the year after his/her decease, even concerning works not disclosed during his/her life.
No. It is necessary to apply for a National Trademark in each Mercosur country
Industrial Designs protect the external configuration or appearance of an object, while Utility Model protects the technical function of an invention.
None of the Mercosur Countries neither Chile have any legal prevision on the exclusivity of the license. Therefore the scope of the license can be freely agreed between the two parties.
Depending on the Mercosur country, the Law refers to Drawings (Dibujos) that are bi-dimensional and Models (Modelos) that are three-dimensional. Generally both are referred to as Industrial Designs and have the same scope of protection: their external appearance.
Ideas "per se" cannot be protected unless they are kept as a secret. Regardless of which Intellectual Property allow you to protect certain aspects of your business such as: Names, logos or signs: Trademarks Inventions: Patents External appearance of an object: Designs Scientific, literary or artistic creations (including software): Copyright Other such as Appellations of Origin or Plant Varieties  
All the Mercosur Countries and Chile provide for a period during the trademark registration procedures when third parties can challenge the trademark application on the basis of absolute and relative grounds of refusal, the Opposition period. The resemblance between the trademark with another prior trademark that may lead to consumer´s confussion is a relative ground that could be opposed in all Mercosur Countries and Chile during such Opposition period.
Trademarks are signs used to distinguish the origin of products and services while a company name is the name of a legal person, both are used in the marketplace and are frecuently confused. It is quite common that companies use their company name as trademark, in such cases it is strongly advised to register the company name as a trademark in order to benefit from the wider scope of protection that trademarks registration offer.
Trademarks are subject to the principle of territoriality; therefore a registration only protects the trademark in the country (or region in the case of the Community Trademarks) where it has been registered. Regardless of which, it is possible to use a trademark in any of the Mercosur countries without registering it, unless it is confusingly similar to a prior trademark. In this case, you should take into account that non-registered trademarks have little (or no) protection. Therefore it will be almost impossible to act against counterfeiters.
Licensing an IPR implies to authorise the use and/or commercial exploitation of such right, while maintaining the ownership of the right whereas transferring implies that the ownership of the IPR is assigned to the acquirer.
It means that the trademarks scope of protection is referred only to those products/services that covers the trademark registration as well as the similar ones. In other words, it is possible that two identical trademarks coexist in the markert (and in the register) subject to both trademarks cover different products and/or services that will not mislead the consumers.
Generally speaking, it is not mandatory to register a patent for commercializing in Mercosur & Chile, however, the patented product would not be protected in such countries and any third party will be able to copy it, moreover, your commercialization without patenting can jeopardize the novelty of any future patent application.
Generally speaking, it is not mandatory to register a design for commercializing in Mercosur & Chile, however, the product would not be protected in such countries and any third party will be able to copy it, moreover, your commercialization without patenting can jeopardize the novelty/originalty of any future design application.
It is not mandatory to register a Trademark before starting to commercialize in a certain country, however it is strongly recommendable to avoid undesirable scenarios such as finding out that a third party has registered your trademark.
There is no general obligation of registering licenses in Mercosur and Chile, but all those countries require its previous registration in order to be opposed to third parties. Countries such as Brazil, require also registration to authorise the international transfer of the royalties paid.
Argentina, Paraguay, Brazil and Uruguay allow the registration of threedimensional trademarks, while Chile will soon allow it.
No, you only should register those trademarks that you are going to use within that region.
A Creative Commons License is a license that is offered to all those that fulfil the terms established by the owner. You can get more information in https://creativecommons.org
Patents protect inventions, i.e solutions for technical problems. Each country have its own limits to patentability, that in general, include those contrary to public order, mere discoveries or living beings.
There are three requirements: Novelty: the invention is not in the prior state of art Inventive step: the invention cannot be obvious for an expert in the field taking into account the state of the art. Industrial applicability Generally the Patent Offices evaluate the first two, whereas is assumed that the market itself evaluates the third one.
The State of the Art is the standard used by the examiners to evaluate the novelty and inventive step of a patent and the novelty/originalty of a design. Comprises all the information that is accessible to the public by its use, oral or written description or any other means in a certain territory (generally , the world).
Usually, when speaking about an Opposition it is referred to an action that a third party brings before a National Office in order to request the refusal of a certain Intellectual Property application.
A well known trademark is trademark that, thanks to its intensive use, marketing campaigns or its long-standing use, have reached a high level of knowledge among the public. The IP Laws in Mercosur Countries and Chile grant special protection to those trademarks, usually by expanding the scope of its protection. Contact our helpline if you want to know more on well know trademarks.
Registration may be done directly before the Local competent authority (normally, National Internet Network Center) or through domain name registrars, which are companies accredited by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) e.g https://nic.ar

Service

Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are defined in the EU recommendation 2003/361. The main factors determining whether a company is an SME are: number of employees and either turnover or balance sheet total. Company category Employees Turnover  or Balance sheet total Medium-sized < 250 ≤ € 50 m ≤ € 43 m Small < 50 ≤ € 10 m ≤ € 10 m Micro < 10 ≤ € 2 m ≤ € 2 m These ceilings apply to the figures for individual firms only. A firm that is part of larger group may need to include employee/turnover/balance sheet data from that group too.
You may send us your questions, suggestions and comments in any of the 5 following languages and you will be answered in the same or another language (on demand): English Spanish French German Portuguese  
You can contact us by telephone, via email, using the contact form of our web-portal, in any of our physical contact points and at any of the events we host or attend. As part of the Helpdesk structure, there are four physical contact points at your disposal: Latin America IPR SME Helpdesk headquarters in Spain: You can contact us either by phone or e-mail: ADDRESS:University of Alicante, Campus San Vicente del Raspeig, Edificio Torre de Control, 03690 Alicante, Spain TEL: +34 96 590 9684  E-MAIL:  head_office@latinamerica-ipr-helpdesk.eu WORKING HOUR: Monday - Friday 9:00 -16:30 (CEST)   Latin America IPR SME Helpdesk Office in Brazil  You can reach us and make your appointment by phone: ADDRESS: Rua Marquês de Olinda, 70 – Botafogo. Rio de Janeiro-RJ, CEP 22251-040 TEL: +55 21 2237-8728 E-MAIL:  brazil@latinamerica-ipr-helpdesk.eu WORKING HOUR: 9h00 - 18h00 (GMT-3)   Latin America IPR SME Helpdesk Office in Mexico  You can reach us and make your appointment by phone: ADDRESS (1): c/del Puente 222 Ejidos de Huipulco, Tlalpan 14380, Ciudad de México, Distrito Federal TEL: +52   (55) 5483-2252 E-MAIL:  mexico@latinamerica-ipr-helpdesk.eu WORKING HOUR: 9h30-18h30 (GMT-5) ADDRESS (2): Avenida Eugenio Garza Lagüera & Rufino Tamayo, Valle Oriente, San Pedro Garza García, 66269, Nuevo León, México TEL: +52 (81) 86256000  E-MAIL:  mexico@latinamerica-ipr-helpdesk.eu WORKING HOUR: 9h00-17h30 (GMT-5)   Latin America IPR SME Helpdesk Office in Chile  You can reach us and make your appointment by phone: ADDRESS: Galvarino Gallardo 1690, Providencia, Santiago TEL: (56-2) 2 787 8422 – 2 787 8400 E-MAIL:  chile@latinamerica-ipr-helpdesk.eu WORKING HOUR: 9h30-18h30 (GMT-3)
It is not mandatory to register for using some services, such as our Factsheets or FAQs. However, the access to the rest of services (i.e Helpline, Workshops or Webinars) requires prior registration. Subscribe to our Newsletter to stay tunned  
No. Users can address our experts as many questions as they will. All of them will be kindly provided with a first-line answer within 3 working days.
To participate in our Webinars or Clinics & Workshops you should have an account as a registered user. If you want to subscribe to our newsletter or use our Helpline, you need to have your own account too. Should you not have it, you can easily create a new user account. It is free of charge.
Our team can be found at any of our contact points. Latin America IPR SME Helpdesk headquarters in Spain: The headquarters are responsible for coordinating all services for users, including the creation of information materials, organisation of training workshops, processing questions, and networking. You can contact us either by phone or e-mail:  Call: +34 96 590 9684 (Monday - Friday 9:00 -17:00, CEST)  E-mail: info@mercosur-iprhelpdesk.eu  Address: University of Alicante, Campus San Vicente del Raspeig, Edificio Torre de Control, 03690 Alicante, Spain Latin America IPR SME Helpdesk Office in Brazil  You can reach us and make your appointment by phone or email: ADDRESS: Rua Marquês de Olinda, 70 – Botafogo. Rio de Janeiro-RJ, CEP 22251-040 TEL: +55 21 2237-8728 E-MAIL:  brazil@latinamerica-ipr-helpdesk.eu WORKING HOUR: 9h00 - 18h00 (GMT-3) Latin America IPR SME Helpdesk Office in Mexico  You can reach us and make your appointment by phone or email: ADDRESS (1): c/del Puente 222 Ejidos de Huipulco, Tlalpan 14380, Ciudad de México, Distrito Federal TEL: +52   (55) 5483-2252 E-MAIL:  mexico@latinamerica-ipr-helpdesk.eu WORKING HOUR: 9h30-18h30 (GMT-5) ADDRESS (2): Avenida Eugenio Garza Lagüera & Rufino Tamayo, Valle Oriente, San Pedro Garza García, 66269, Nuevo León, México TEL: +52 (81) 86256000  E-MAIL:  mexico@latinamerica-ipr-helpdesk.eu WORKING HOUR: 9h00-17h30 (GMT-5) Latin America IPR SME Helpdesk Office in Chile  You can reach us and make your appointment by phone or email: ADDRESS: Galvarino Gallardo 1690, Providencia, Santiago TEL: (56-2) 2 787 8422 – 2 787 8400 E-MAIL:  chile@latinamerica-ipr-helpdesk.eu WORKING HOUR: 9h30-18h30 (GMT-3)
Our experts will provide you with an answer within three working days from the reception of the question.
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